Tools

 CA ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION SAFETY INFORMATION PAGES (CATSIP)
The California Active Transportation Safety Information Pages is a website intended to provide a single, comprehensive, California-centric online destination for authoritative, evidence-based information on practices, methods, and resources to support efforts to improve the safety, efficiency, and attractiveness of pedestrian, bicycle, and other types of non-motor-vehicle travel.

STREET STORY: A PLATFORM FOR COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
Street Story is a community engagement tool that allows residents, community groups and agencies to collect information about transportation collisions, near-misses, general hazards and safe locations to travel. The platform and the information collected is free to use and publicly accessible. The tool was created by a team of city planners, public health professionals, engineers, social welfare experts and computer scientists at UC Berkeley’s Safe Transportation Research and Education Center (SafeTREC).

TRANSPORTATION INJURY MAPPING SYSTEM (TIMS)
The Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS) has been developed by SafeTREC's GIS Program team to provide quick, easy and free access to California crash data that has been geo-coded to make it easy to map out crashes and even view the locations in Google Street View.

The following tools are currently available on TIMS:

  • SWITRS Query & Map
  • SWITRS GIS Map
  • California Safety PM Target Setting
  • Collision Diagram
  • Safe Routes to School Map Viewer
  • ATP Maps & Summary Data
  • Motorcycle Collision Map

To use the site, simply create an account and log in using the password that will be instantly emailed to your inbox. 

TRIBAL CRASH DATA TOOL
SafeTREC works in collaboration with the National Indian Justice Center (NIJC) to enhance the capacity of tribal entities to collect crash data and submit this data to the Statewide Integrated Traffic Record System (SWITRS) and use SWITRS data to conduct traffic safety analyses on tribal lands. SafeTREC developed a tribal crash data tool by obtaining shapefiles from 107 of the 110 federally recognized tribal areas in California; the remaining three tribal areas are landless or comprise only trust land owned by individual tribal members. These shape files define tribal boundaries, and by overlaying geocoded collision data from the Transportation Injury Mapping System (TIMS) onto these shape files, a description (number, type, etc.) of traffic collisions was generated. Geocoded crash data for a ten-year period has been linked with tribal shape files to identify injury collisions within tribal boundaries and in the immediate vicinity of tribal areas. Since tribal lands have not been identified by a SWITRS jurisdiction code, this is the first time in California that it was possible to determine traffic collision trends/patterns in tribal areas. This data tool provides tribes with access to a web-based interactive analysis and mapping tool for tribal areas.